The Little Movie That Couldn’t: An Oral History of Elliott Gould’s Never-Completed “A Glimpse of Tiger”

There are few in-depth Elliott Gould profiles that don't mention "A Glimpse of Tiger," the abandoned 1971 Warner Bros. dark comedy that Gould was slated to co-produce and star in. Fresh from the harrowing but ego-boosting tutelage of Ingmar Bergman, who'd selected Gould as his first American actor to star in his 1970 melodrama "The …

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The Mouse That Charmed: An Evening with Kim Darby

When I called the now-retired actress Kim Darby at her California home a few months ago--to discuss her more obscure 1960s and 1970s work--she apologized (needlessly) for having taken a few days to free up her schedule. Her sister was in town, she explained, and her house was a total mess. Dishes were piled up …

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The Early Days of Boston/Cambridge Cinema: An Interview with Director Jan Egleson

I have spent a great deal of time on this blog bringing forgotten or undiscovered trash classics to people's attention, but the first legitimately great film I watched, where I felt a real sense of loss from its obscurity, was Jan Egleson's 1979 drama "Billy in the Lowlands." Shot on location in working-class Cambridge, it is …

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Sung Antiheroes: An Interview with “Goin’ Down the Road” Director Donald Shebib

Paul Lynch's 1973 slice-of-life film "The Hard Part Begins" (previously discussed in a profile of Lynch on this blog) may never have seen the light of day if not for Donald Shebib. Three years earlier, Shebib directed and co-wrote "Goin' Down the Road," a downbeat tale of two drifters that is still considered to be …

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Elliott Gould’s More Obscure Films, Part 3: 1990 to Present

Before I launch into a long overdue defense of the critically savaged "Lemon Sisters" (in which Elliott Gould plays a small but key role), I want to devote a little space to its director, Joyce Chopra, whom I interviewed over the phone in July and who has been sadly out of the public eye for …

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Elliott Gould Discusses His Lesser-Known Films, Part 2: The 1980s

Precious few of Elliott Gould's 1980s films are available on Netflix. The exceptions are "The Muppets Take Manhattan," in which he cameos as a harried police officer; the criminally underrated Christopher Guest Hollywood satire, "The Big Picture," another delicious cameo opportunity for Gould; the lame 1989 horror flick "The Night Visitor"; and two children's films …

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The Lesser Known (or Less Celebrated) Films of Elliott Gould (Part 1)

Most Elliott Gould interviews conducted between 1974 and today chronicle the same career high and lows. Born in 1938 and raised in Brooklyn, he was pushed into show business uneasily at an early age by his mother, presumably to get over a persistent shyness. Nonetheless, he blossomed into a tap dancer, singer and impersonator; he landed a starring …

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“Charlie’s Party” (2005)

Those who like their group sex comedies on the neurotic side (with more stewing than screwing) might want to check out "Charlie's Party,"  the small 2005 comedy directed by Catherine Cahn and produced by "The Station Agent" producer Barry Sisson. Think of it as a "Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice" for uptight East …

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The Hollywood Fixer: “Galaxina” Director William Sachs

Director William Sachs is perhaps best known for "Galaxina," the deliberately schlocky, Mel Brooks-esque spoof of "Star Wars" and other sci-fi epics. Released in 1980, the film featured Dorothy Stratten--the 20 year-old Playboy centerfold murdered the same year by her husband--in her most prominent film role, as a sexy, mostly mute robot that wows a …

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An interview with Paul Morrissey

Paul Morrissey hates so-called "independent" cinema. He hates being lumped into that genre, even though he could be seen as a pioneer of the current small-scale indie film format. In 1965, at age 27, the budding filmmaker began collaborating with Andy Warhol on film projects; by 1967, the films released by the Warhol Factory bore …

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